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PHP MongoDB Wrapper Class: Perform common types MongoDB database queries

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mongodbwrapper 1.0.0GNU General Publi...5PHP 5, Databases
Description Author

This is a wrapper class to Perform common types MongoDB database queries.

It connects to a given MongoDB server and performs several types of common queries. Currently it can:

- Query collections using given filter options
- Query all documents in a collection
- Perform insert or remove operations from a list of parameters

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Details

MongoDB Wrapper

This class has been built with the goal of simplifying basic CRUD functions for use with MongoDB.

Setup

MongoDB

Installing MongoDB on your machine is as simple as doing install mongodb in your Package Manager. > i.e > MacOSX - brew install mongodb > Centos - yum install mongodb > Ubuntu - apt-get install mongodb

If you are unsure, there are guides available to assist you in the installation. >[Install on Linux][2] >Install MongoDB Community Edition and required dependencies on Linux. >[Install on OS X][3] >Install MongoDB Community Edition on OS X systems from Homebrew packages or from MongoDB archives. >[Install on Windows][4] >Install MongoDB Community Edition on Windows systems and optionally start MongoDB as a Windows service. >

PHP-MongoDB

In order to setup PHP to work with MongoDB, you will need to download and install the php-mongodb [driver][1] for your version of PHP.

> Note:

> Based on which OS you are using, your installation may differ. > Please refer to [this][2] guide to install the driver for your version of PHP on your OS > > For OSX users, you may receive a dylib error when attempting to run a PHP script which utilises the php-mongodb driver. > If this is the case with you, try the following to resolve the issue. > > - Run brew reinstall --build-from-source php-mongodb (where is the version of PHP) > - Run brew update and attempt to reinstall. > - Run brew doctor, and fix as many issues as possible then attempt to reinstall. > [Github Issue Page][5]

To confirm that you have the PHP MongoDB driver installed successfully, you can run the below command in your Terminal / Command Prompt to validate that your PHP Installation can see your PHP-MongoDB Driver

php -i | grep mongodb

You should receive output similar to the below;

> mongodb > mongodb support => enabled > mongodb version => 1.1.9 > mongodb stability => stable > mongodb.debug => no value => no value

Connecting

Include the class in your project: include('/path/to/class/db.php');

Build your array of Connection Parameters:

  $settings = array(
      'host' => 'localhost',
      'user' => 'user',
      'pass' => 'password',
      'port' => '27017',
      'db' => 'test',
      'connectionName' => 'default',
      'connectionOptions' => array(),
  );

The Db class Constructor accepts 1 argument, which is simply an array of settings which are required to connect to your database.

All fields are mandatory, with the exception of connectionName & connectionOptions (which simply needs to be an empty array).

Connect to MongoDB;


$Db = new Db($settings);

Inserting

Inserting data is as simple as constructing an array, and calling the interact() function;

$query = array(
    'dbname' => 'users.dfc_users',
    'type' => 'insert'
);


$users = array();

$users[] = array(
    'name' => 'Peter Griffin',
    'age' => intval(40),
    'phone' => '07711001001',
    'status' => 'Married',
    'mental_capacity' => 'Child'
);

$users[] = array(
    'name' => 'Glen Quagmire',
    'age' => intval(38),
    'phone' => '07711001002',
    'status' => 'Single',
    'dependants' => 1092
);

$users[] = array(
    'name' => 'Joe Swanson',
    'age' => intval(42),
    'phone' => '07711001003',
    'status' => 'Married',
    'occupation' => 'Police Officer'
);

$query['data'] = $users;

$Db->interact($query);

Breaking down the above example, you will see that the array is constructed with two compulsary fields, required to perform the insert;

$query = array(
    'collection' => 'users.user_details',
    'type' => 'insert'
);

When the array is constructed, we pass in the collection we are inserting into, and the 'type' of our 'interaction'.

In this example, we have specified the Database users with the Table user_details, by defining the collection field as users.user_details.

The 'type' has also been set to insert specifying that we are going to be inserting whatever is in the data field, into the specified collection.

Next we construct the data which will be inserted into the database, and then set the $query['data'] variable with it. (You will notice one slight problem with the data being set; but let's not worry about that for now.)

Then, to perform the 'interaction', we call the function with our $query array.

Querying Data

Querying data can be done in two ways, queryAll() and query().

queryAll()

The easiest one to use is queryAll()

This accepts one parameter, which is simply the collection you want to query.

$db->queryAll('users.user_details');

This will return an array of all of the items in the the specified collection. If you run a var_dump() our previously created table, it should look similar to this;


array(3) {
  [0] =>
  class stdClass#7 (6) {
    public $_id =>
    class MongoDB\BSON\ObjectID#6 (1) {
      public $oid =>
      string(24) "5829cb2d6284f4bad0394071"
    }
    public $name =>
    string(13) "Peter Griffin"
    public $age =>
    int(40)
    public $phone =>
    string(11) "07711001001"
    public $status =>
    string(7) "Married"
    public $mental_capacity =>
    string(5) "Child"
  }
  [1] =>
  class stdClass#9 (6) {
    public $_id =>
    class MongoDB\BSON\ObjectID#8 (1) {
      public $oid =>
      string(24) "5829cb2d6284f4bad0394072"
    }
    public $name =>
    string(13) "Glen Quagmire"
    public $age =>
    int(38)
    public $phone =>
    string(11) "07711001002"
    public $status =>
    string(6) "Single"
    public $dependants =>
    int(1092)
  }
  [2] =>
  class stdClass#11 (6) {
    public $_id =>
    class MongoDB\BSON\ObjectID#10 (1) {
      public $oid =>
      string(24) "5829cb2d6284f4bad0394073"
    }
    public $name =>
    string(11) "Joe Swanson"
    public $age =>
    int(42)
    public $phone =>
    string(11) "07711001003"
    public $status =>
    string(7) "Married"
    public $occupation =>
    string(14) "Police Officer"
  }
}

query()

The query function can be as simple or as complex as you would like it to be, dependant on what you require.

The query call requires 3 parameters; $collection, $filter, $options and can be called like so;

$Db->query($collection,$filter,$options)

The first parameter passed in, is $collection. This is the same as in the previous examples, where it is a string representation of the database.table.

The second parameter passed in is $filter. This is where you will add all of what would be the WHERE clauses, only a little differently... In an array style Markup.

The third parameter passed in is $options. This is where you define what would be your SELECT statement, and sorting preferences, also in an array style Markup.

$filter Operations

Fields

Filtering by fields will operate in the same way as an SQL query will through the use of the WHERE clause. For example, the following SQL;

...
WHERE
  status = 'active';

would be defined in MongoDB as;

$filter = array(
  'status' => 'active'
);

Operators

Query operators, such as Greater Than ($gt), Less Than ($lt), Logical AND, & Logical OR work in the same way. However, they are embeded as arrays themselves. Some examples would be;


// Examples of Greater Than & Less Than Operators

$filter = array(
  'age' => array(
    '$gt' => 10
  ),
  'age' => array(
    '$lt' => 50
  )
);

// Example of Logical AND

$filter = array(
  'status' => 'active',
  'town' => 'Aylesbury'
);

// Example of Logical OR

$filter = array(
  '$or' => array(
  'status' => 'active',
  'town' => 'Aylesbury'
  )
);

$options parameters

Selecting Columns

In order to limit the columns which are returned from your query, you will need to set the projection option, with an array of column names you would like to show with a boolean (1 or 0) value. e.g.

$options = array(
  'projection' => array(
    'name' => 1,
    'age' => 1,
    '_id' => 0
  )
);

This will return us with only the name and age columns. By default, if you do not explicitly remove the _id column, it will always be returned.

Sorting

To specify an order for the result set, you simply need to add the 'sort' option to your options array, and specify what you would like to sort results by. You define this by specifying a field to sort by, and assigning either a 1 (ascending) or -1 (descending) to the field; e.g.

  $options = array(
    'sort' => array(
      'age' => 1
    )
  );

For a full list of query options you can define in your applications. Please consult the PHP.net manual [here][6]

Deleting / Removing

Removing data from your collections works in the same way as with inserting, with the exception that rather than building a multidimensional array of data to insert, you construct an array for your WHERE clause. Much in the same way the WHERE clause in the query function is constructed, you construct your query with the collection and type parameters, with the type set as remove, then you pass in the parameters you would like your query to execute to the data field and call the interact() function with your query.

e.g.

$query = array(
  'collection' => 'users.user_data',
  'type' => 'remove',
  'data' => array(
      'age' => array(
          '$gt' => 40
      ),
      'status' => 'Married',
      'occupation' => 'Police Officer'
  )
); 

$Db->interact($query);

Executing this query, will remove all entries where the age is greater than 40, that have a status of 'Married', and who's occupation is 'Police Officer'. This works in the same way that an SQL / MySQL query would work, where all conditions specified are true for the record it is removing.

License

This MongoDB Wrapper class is open-sourced software licensed under the [MIT license][7].

Further Reading

For more details on working with MongoDB and PHP, I found the following resources extremely useful while writing this class.

[MongoDB Website][8] [MongoDB Driver Class PHP.net Page][9] [ZetCode MongoDB PHP Tutorial][10]

[1]: http://php.net/manual/en/set.mongodb.php [2]: https://docs.mongodb.com/manual/administration/install-on-linux/ "Linux" [3]: https://docs.mongodb.com/manual/tutorial/install-mongodb-on-os-x/ "OSX" [4]: https://docs.mongodb.com/manual/tutorial/install-mongodb-on-windows/ "Windows" [5]: https://github.com/Homebrew/homebrew-core/issues/6236 [6]: http://php.net/manual/en/mongodb-driver-query.construct.php [7]: https://opensource.org/licenses/MIT [8]: https://docs.mongodb.com/getting-started/shell/introduction [9]: http://php.net/manual/en/book.mongodb.php [10]: http://zetcode.com/db/mongodbphp/

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